We Don’t Have Time For A Gay Centrist: The Pete Buttigieg Story

Pete_Buttigieg_-_33249197628_(1).jpg

Political polarization is both a real problem in American politics and the current way of the nation. Combine that with how identity politics now seem immensely important and simultaneously not enough. Now enter in the first mainstream gay candidate for president and you may be slightly shocked that even #GayTwitter isn’t all that impressed once the Billy Eichner endorsement after-glow wears off.

Mayor Pete, as he seems to have been dubbed due to a difficult surname, seems to gain in the polls while losing the progressives in the party for the exact same reasons. Pete Buttigieg is actually quite moderate. And, even worse for the gay masses on the internet, he’s quite boring.

People seemed to almost want him to sashay into his rally with RuPaul’s “Champion” playing over the loud speaker while espouses unequivocal support for all progressive ideas and make out with his husband like Al Gore at the 2000 convention.

512px-Pete_Buttigieg_para_Presidente_(1).svg.png

Instead, what we’re given is the democratic equivalent of a Mitt Romney. Romney is mormon and republican but has no appeal to any far-right political base outside of the fact that he’s quite religious. Mayor Pete is gay and a democrat, but seems to have no appeal to any far-left base outside of the fact that he is gay.

If we’re looking for a flamboyant gay man to support in the 2020 election, there is one running. It’s Elizabeth Warren.

To put it more plainly in a referance to a TV show that was cancelled in 2013, Elizabeth Warren in the democratic Penny Hartz, and Pete Buttigieg is Max.

Each time one of Mayor Pete’s moderate points of view is revealed, there’s a collective eye roll form all the progressives out there, but a slight up-tick in polls from those moderate democrats out there that definitely still exist. It highlights how 2020 is, in effect, a soul-searching year for the Democrats. The Democratic Party has to figure out who they are and what they want. Unfortunately, the primaries may solidify both while a resulting candidate, like a Joe Biden, could end up being neither.